Remove Stains, Spots: Grease Spots

To do this without injury to the color of the fabric, is sometimes easy, frequently most difficult and often impossible. Much may depend upon skillful and persevering manipulation; and although various agents are often-times valuable, yet good soap, after all, is the...

Remove Stains, Spots: Pitch, Varnish, Oil-Paint

When pitch, varnish or oil-paint stains have become dry, they should be softened with a little butter or lard, before using turpentine and soap. In these cases, a simple way is to soak the part in spirits of turpentine and when softened to wash it off with the same...

Remove Stains, Spots: Resin

The following receipts embrace directions for cleaning and removing stains of every kind, from clothing, linen, etc., and articles pertaining to the household. To remove resin spots from silk: Stains by wax, resin, turpentine, pitch, and substances of a resinous...

Glue in the 1870s

The hotter the glue, the more force it will exert in keeping the two parts glued together; therefore, in all large and long joints the glue should be applied immediately after boiling. Glue loses much of its strength by frequent re-melting; that glue, therefore, which...

Receipts for the Flower and Kitchen Garden

The aim of the following receipts is to afford information for the treatment of ornamental indoor plants, and for the general requirements and improvement of the flower and kitchen garden, without entering into the principles of either agriculture of horticulture. To...

Ready-Mixed Paint

1880s, United States Although painted interior house walls were popular since about 1500 B.C., and paint itself had been known for some twenty thousand years, the first commercial, ready-mixed paints did not appear until 1880. Home owners and professionals had been...