I like using the following expletives, or mild oaths and other terminology listed here:

  • Confound it: To express confusion or amazement.
  • Botheration: Just an exclamation, like for heaven’s sake. This is one that Nicola uses in Rescue a Rake.
  • Thunderation: An exclamation that Nicola’s father prefers using in Rescue a Rake
  • Blast: As in “Blast Ramsey for getting her into this situation” (from Rescue a Rake). 
  • Oh, la! — Like, Oh, my!
  • Et, wot? as in “You know?” or “Right?” in contemporary talk.
  • Faith! is like “oh, la!” except generally used to express greater wonderment.
  • Zooks! This is a mild, exclamatory oath that emerged in the seventeenth century. It’s the shortened version of gadzooks, which could be a word for God’s hooks (that is, the nails used to secure Jesus to the cross). So essentially, when someone in the Regency times says “zooks,” one is saying hooks. 🙂 Also Zooterkins.
  • Chuckle-headed: ditzy, dimwitted.
  • Deuced: this mild oath refers to rolling a two in dice, which is the lowest possible score one might get. For this reason, the word is used to refer to things of less-than-ideal luck and generally has the same meaning as “damned” or “cursed.”
  • By Jove! … An exclamation.
  • By the bye–incidentally. Can also be spelled “by the by.” 
  • By blow–bastard.
  • By George–a mild oath.
  • Bad form: as in “Not cool.”
  • Bamboozle: a hoax or to deceive.
  • Blasted: like, “That blasted cat shredded my curtains.” Similar to confounded.
  • In the briers, which means “in trouble.”
  • Bundle off–to send away in a hurry.
  • Bounder: Same as cad or rotter or scoundrel.
  • Thunder and turf! — Another exclamation like botheration. This is one I picked up from reading Georgette Heyer Regencies. 
  • Goose cap: Don’t be a goose cap! (Like a silly goose). Nicola in Rescue a Rake calls herself this. 🙂 
  • Tiens! — Same as “Oh, my gosh!” I have the Upper Crust use it when gossipmongers are talking about Nicola. 
  • Dash it all — substitute for darn it.